What do I think of ART?

I just wanted to get your thoughts about ART. Is it really worth the money and, is more valuable then any other type of STM?

.....because I'm not updated on my Certification.

…..because I’m not updated on my Certification.

I think it is a very useful technique.  I think the $$ is actually reasonable given that, in my opinion, it is acknowledged and known by a large part of the rehab customer market.  Now, if you don’t work in a setting where you can recoup your investment, then that doesn’t matter much.
For your money, you will get enormous opportunities to practice during the 3-4 days you’re there.  And also, in my opinion, you can become very competent in most of the techniques very quickly.

Is this coursework a good option to learn the realities of soft tissue histology and/or myogenic pain?  Absolutely not.  The amount of time dedicated to these things is miniscule, but that doesn’t make the course bad.  It’s >90% a technique course, and if you already have a great background with a systematic approach to complete evaluation and pain science, you WANT a course that only teaches you techniques.  ART works, just not in any way because of the reasons they may teach you.  But I would just say who cares.
If the technique applies the unique stressors to change pain, improve mobility, or prep for motor skill acquisition, who cares if someone believes you are sliding on adhesions or not, which you’re totally not.

The principles of Andreo Spina’s Functional Range Release and many of the concepts we learn from Dr. Warren Hammer, Cantu, Stecco, Mark Scapaticci and the horsemen of the Fascial Congress are far more contemporary and science-based.

Take these first, then ART to see what actually happens when we use our hands.

Take these first, then ART to see what actually happens when we use our hands.

One thing you can consider if you are not sure is to check out the ART Spine course first as it is cheaper.  The concepts of the actual application are universal to the tissues of the appendages.

Is it more valuable than other techniques?  That’s hard to answer.
Actually, it’s not hard to answer.  No, it’s not more valuable.  But there is no 1 technique that is more valuable than another.  There are some that are more powerful, but again, they are only powerful if you know how to do them correctly, and they are right for the patient or client based off a great screening, testing, and assessing.

I’m overdue for a course, but I’d like to do the updated SFMA/ART course or a review course.

It is an excellent technique so I leave you with a positive thought and nobody gets their panties in a bunch when they only remember what they perceive as negative in this article.

Dude, it was a positive article.

Dude, it was a positive article.

 

  • January 27, 2015

Leave a Reply 4 comments

Chris Reply

Hello,
What do you mean by “sliding on adhesions?” Can ART break adhesions?

Dan Reply

Chris,

No manual technique breaks up adhesions. Our hands-on techniques provide input to the CNS allowing decreased threat perception leading to improved movement patterns.

Ryan Davis Reply

I’d say like almost any reputable continuing education class I have attended it is worth the money. For ART, it’s value lies as much in the detailed anatomical methodology it utilizes as the actual technique. When we compare the hyper inflated costs of formal education the value drawn from your course, DNS, SFMA, ART, DN, etc. have value levels that are magnitudes of order better. That being said, the continuing education requirements for ART in order to maintain certification have not proven justifiable in my opinion.

P.S. I would have much rather spent my $200,000 tuition to have four years of “Charlie Weingroff’s A-team education” Can you imagine, you could take one PT or Chiro class of 100 students for four years and pocket a cool $20,000,000.

What a messed up a world we have in American higher education.

Charlie Reply

I have taken many courses that have not been worth the money, but hindsight is 20/20.

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